1. Sample #1

Hydrological Research Letters, Vol.1, p.1-4, doi:hrl/1.1

Title: Estimation of the hydrograph of the Yangtze River during future extreme events based on hydrological and atmospheric numerical models.

Authors: Mike Irving and Zadok Uvo

Editorial Comments:
The present study is an interesting piece of work that shows how it might be possible to estimate hydrographs of the Yangtze River during extreme events for the middle of the 21st century, based on the physically-based method. This study demonstrates that the estimation reliably works there. The authors employ both a distributed hydrological model and an atmospheric regional model, apply an ensemble method to this estimation, and obtain the hydrographs with uncertainty. Though a reviewer raises a grave concern about the reliability, I am sure that this estimation is valuable for the advance of hydrological research and social mitigation. Both scientific interest and originality are highly evaluated. Thus, I recommended that this paper is worth for publishing in Hydrological Research Letters.

Corresponding Editor : Katumi Musiake


2. Sample #2

Hydrological Research Letters, Vol.1, p.5-8, doi:hrl/1.5

Title: Comparing three distributed runoff models in the Mekong river basin

Authors: Peter White and Atsushi Saitoh

Editorial comments:
This paper reports application of three different distributed runoff models in the Mekong river basins and reveals different model performances in the dry seasons of the basin: the evapotranspiration from one of the model was too much and the other two generated too little. From the monitoring data of soil moisture profile, the authors concluded that evaporation from the vadose zone is important rather than vegetation activities in the dry season.
One reviewer questioned about the authors’ conclusion drawn from the limited field data, but I believe that authors’ insightful understandings of vadose zone are worthy to be shared among the readers of HRL. Thus I confidently recommend this paper to be published in this journal.

Corresponding Editor: Carlos Fernandez


3. Sample #3

Hydrological Research Letters, Vol.1, p.9-12, doi:hrli/1.9

Title: Review: Prospect of Watershed Hydrology in the Next Decade

Authors: David Lin and Kenji Yamashita

Editorial comments:
Hydrological Research Letters, Vol.1, p.9-12, doi:hrl/1.9
This paper reviews current research progresses in watershed hydrology to find a new way to overcome the problems of equifinality [Beven, 1998] for modelers and knowledge transferability for experimentalists. The authors suggests constraining modeler’s hypotheses and experimentalists’ field-based evidences each other would guide us to achieve “right answer for the right reasons [Kirchner, 2006]” in theory, modeling, and field observation of watershed hydrology.
I have no doubt that this paper is of broad interests for the Hydrological Research Letters readers, and I recommend this paper is to be published in this journal.

Corresponding Editor: Yoshiyuki Yokoo


4. Sample #4

Hydrological Research Letters, Vol.1, p.13-16, doi:hrl/1.9

Title: Watershed classification in humid and semiarid regions in the Asia-Pacific regions

Authors: Naoki Hayashi and George Bergman

Editorial comments:
This paper suggests a methodology to classify watersheds in humid and semi-arid regions based on the catchment characterization for climate, topography, soil, and geologic conditions. The authors summarized relative effects of catchment characteristics by statistical methods as the basis for the classification of humid and semiarid catchment. The research topic would significantly contribute to the prediction of ungauged basins in the Asia-Pacific regions.
I am sure that this topic is relevant for the HRL readership, and recommend this paper published in the HRL.

Corresponding Editor:


5. Sample #5

Hydrological Research Letters, Vol.1, p.17-20, doi:hrl/1.9

Title: Impacts of El Nino Southern Oscillation and the Indian Ocean Dipole on the interannual variability in precipitation in Australia

Authors: Mike Irving and Zadok Uvo

The present study discusses the impact of both the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IDO) on the interannual variability in precipitation in Australia, which has been shown to have significant impacts on human activities as agriculture and water resources in the previous studies. Such impacts have been examined from the view point of the ENSO, but not yet from both points of the ENSO and IDO, that is the merit and the originality of this study. The impact of the IDO is statistically significant, though the ENSO has larger impacts than the IDO in Australia. The two reviewers have favorable evaluations since they consider the manuscript provides new scientific contribution. For these reasons, I am happy to recommend this study for the publication in Hydrological Research Letters.

Corresponding Editor: Keisuke Nakayama